Sunday, June 27, 2010

Mighty Microscope!

Today's post is a cheat. There, I said it.

This is a scan from a page in the Spring 1974 issue of "Vacationland" magazine. I liked the picture so much that I decided I needed it as desktop wallpaper. Perhaps you do too?


And still I continue to shrink....!

14 comments:

********************** said...

Forward units proceeding beyond limits of optical magnification. All phases activate DLX system, verify voltage compensators. Phase blue: DLX system go. Focusing on H2O molecules. Advanced atomobiles obscured. All primary phases pinpoint CC factor of condenser coil, verify triangulation. Phase blue: CC factor rectified. Advanced atomobiles coming into focus. All phases lock on to present CC factor and hold until all atomobiles past beyond DLX range.

Michelle said...

Thank was the greatest ride! I miss it! :(

Chuck said...

We have you on visual. Otherwise we'd never see this post.

Thanks for sharing!

Anonymous said...

A lovely picture and well worth cheating!

This ride was a gem, representing as it did science presented with a heavy dose of fantasy. Those who criticize the later, more fantasy-laden Tomorrowland incarnations at the various parks (and, don't get me wrong, much of that criticism is spot-on) sometimes forget that the element of fantasy was always present in Tomorrowland, just as it was in all the lands of the park. Main Street was a fantasy version of small-town America, Frontierland was a fantasy version of frontier history, and ... well, you get the point (you already got the point, I suspect, if you're sophisticated enough to be a regular reader of "Gorillas Don't"). Tomorrowland was a fantasyland of the future, its teachings grounded in science and technology, but its presentation fully dependent on what Disney did best: the fantastic. "Adventure Through Inner Space" epitomized this better, in my lofty opinion, than any other Tomorrowland ride. That many people seem to understand this, at least subconsciously, is probably why it's a nostalgic favorite of many of us, high on our list of long-gone attractions that we would resurrect if we could only wave our own magic wands.

Whew! And all that babbling before my first cup of java. And now I am off to my locally-owned, independent, coffee house to start the real work of the day: caffeination.

Thufer said...

It was so very good. I love Star Tours, just to bad they both couldn't be around at the same time. Ah progress!

TokyoMagic! said...

I like Star Tours too, but I thought it was strange after it debuted, that Mission to Mars was still kept open and that the two attractions continued to coexist for almost 6 more years. I loved Mission to Mars, but after Star Tours opened it became a very outdated simulator attraction in comparison. I always wondered why Star Tours didn't just replace Mission to Mars?

I remember Tomorrowland employees back in the early '80's talking about plans for possibly updating Adventure Thru Inner Space with new effects. I wonder if that was ever a real consideration?

Debbie V. said...

When I first began to surf the internet, Adventure through Inner Space was what I was looking for - back in the early 1990's. (a close second to the Pack Mules through Nature's Wonderland). These two rides were a perfect example of the diversity of Disneyland. My favorite subjects in school were science and nature.
Tomorrowland was a Sci-Fi comes true place.

Rich T. said...

When I rode ATIS for the first time as a small child, it taught me (in four minutes) about molecules, atoms, electrons, and the idea that nothing is truly solid. It actually made me think about the universe. The giant human eye looking at riders through the microscope was the best finale I can remember.

There was a comforting optimism in that ride: You witnessed nature's wonders, went to the edge of no return, then were drawn safely home by the competence and careful planning of the scientists...who apparently all worked for Monsanto. I had no idea what Monsanto was, except that they had an awesome theme song and made cool things out of plastic!

I sure miss ATIS. Star Tours is awesome, but I agree that I'd like to have seen it replace Mission to Mars instead. There should be a law against Disney removing any omnimover ride systems (or any ride with a Paul Frees narration)...ever!

Kevin Kidney said...

You're right! I do! Need this as my desktop wallpaper, that is. Thank you, Major.

Nancy said...

another great adventure gone by the wayside....so sad!

i have always thought this was one of their coolest inventions. i wonder what happened to the microscope when the ride closed?

thanks for the nice wallpaper ;-)

Anonymous said...

Straight to the Desk Top. Major, you rock.

I loved that ride, and basically...

what Thufer said, in fact, What Everybody said.

There's plenty of room in Tomorrowland...

BRING BACK THE MIGHTY MICROSCOPE...

JG

Vintage Disneyland Tickets said...

"And still I continue to shrink..." Am I the only one that gets goose bumps when they read that?

Hey Major, that scan is so clear, what did you scan it at, 4,800,000 DPI???

Major Pepperidge said...

Ha ha! Tim, I think I might have scanned it at 200 dpi. I did clean it up with the clone tool, and I have a neat Photoshop plugin that does a great job reducing grain so that the thing looks cleaner than it did in the magazine!

Okie said...

That's so cool. I only went on the ride once and I was fairly young (8 or 9?) but I have good memories of it. The idea was a lot of fun and I was kind of a science-geek even then so I was intrigued by the stuff they showed.

Thanks for finding the image and sharing it. :)