Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Three From September 1976

Some wise photographer visited Disneyland in1976, and the first thing he did (I actually know it was a "he"!) was take a photo of an attraction poster - in this case one of the beautiful later silkscreened examples, created with not six colors, not eight colors, but SIXTY individual colors. Imagine the time and labor it took to produce these! I am happy to own one, if you'd like to get a better look, check it out at this post.


This next image shows the landing for the Canoes and Keel Boats, just north of where the Haunted Mansion is. This might be the only photo in my entire collection that shows the Hungry Bear restaurant (to our right), one my favorite places to eat. Even on somewhat busy days I've been able to grab a table overlooking the river. It's surprisingly peaceful and pretty, and you get to wave to the guests aboard the Mark Twain or Columbia as they pass.


It's hard to tell where this photo was taken from… maybe Tom Sawyer Island? It sure doesn't feel like we're in an amusement park, though!


8 comments:

Nanook said...

Major-

Although I have more than a special place in my heart for the original series of Disneyland attraction posters, it's hard not to marvel at this one for the "Bicentennial Special". It is quite something. And, hey, I thought I was one of the few guests who knew where to find ample seating and a great view while dining near the Rivers of America: The Hungry Bear Restaurant.

Thanks, Major.

Pegleg Pete said...

Hold your tongues! Now everyone's going to know how peaceful and pleasant the Hungry Bear is!

K. Martinez said...

I loved Bear Country simply because it was the most tranquil area of the park back then. A great way to escape the summer crowds. After being replaced by Critter Country and the addition of Splash Mountain that feeling of getting away from the hubbub disappeared.

Love the Hungry Bear image. Thanks, Major.

Melissa said...

And now,ladies and gentlemen, the backside of Mark Twain!

Patrick Devlin said...

Yeah, I can empathize with some for those fond feelings for Bear Country (or as I call it, Frontierland). One of my favorite spots in the park is all the way in the back corner past Winnie the Pooh's Hung-over Heffalump Adventure. There's a small waterfall (oh, maybe six feet tall or so) back there and since it's a dead end I can pause in the shade, listen to the water, and pretend for a few moments that I have the park all to myself.

As for the Mark Twain shot I'll go with it being shot from Castle Rock. Just a guess, of course...

Major Pepperidge said...

Nanook, during my last few visits to the park (and I don't go that often), I always make a point to dine at the Hungry Bear. It has become a favorite!

Pegleg Pete, I think that most people aren't willing to walk to the Hungry Bear when there are so many restaurants along the way. Really!

K. Martinez, I didn't go to the HB until a few years ago, so I can't speak to how it used to be, but we still manage to get a table next to the water, and if you go all the way to the back of the restaurant, you can even get away from most of the crowds. It's still worthwhile!

Melissa, wha whaaaa (sad trombone)!

Patrick Devlin, now I'll have to look for the area you mentioned. I know some people enjoy a spot over by Big Thunder Ranch too, but I've never made it back there. It's supposed to be quiet and nice!

Chuck said...

Patrick Devlin - That little waterfall has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid. It was always a nice treat after coming out of the Country Bear Playhouse, and I like the way it feeds the little stream that winds (wound?) its way through Bear/Critter (Bare Critter?) Country. It also does a great job of masking backstage noise and the sounds of street traffic.

Major & Ken - If you go all the way to the back of the HB on the ground floor and are patient, you can watch the trains go by from paper-airplane-throwing distance. Another fun corner of the Park.

Anonymous said...

Could have been working the canoes that day. HB remains a definite favorite to get away from the crowds and remember the way it used to be. We'd even take breaks under the top deck along the walkway underneath...there were so few guests there that nobody would notice! KS