Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Christmas Around the World, 1960 (part 3)

It's time more backstage photos of the "Christmas in Many Lands" parade...part three of four, if you're keeping track. Hope you are not getting bored, 'cause there's one more day to go!


Does anybody have a clue as to where exactly these pictures were taken? If you look at some of the previous posts, you can see a distinctive little wooden building (it almost looks like a guard station made of logs!). Maybe that will help?


In Matterhorn1959's opinion, this parade was performed only once a year. If so (and I would bet on his knowledge any day), these are extra special photos of a parade that was only seen 8 times.

7 comments:

Merlinsguy said...

I thought I knew everything about D-land backstage, but this stumps me.

Merlinsguy said...

By the way, Gorilla, I have a nice 8x10 of Black Bart from 1956. You're welcome to it for posting if it's appropriate for your site. I don't know how to reach you though.

Major Pepperidge said...

Hey merlinsguy...unless I am confusing you with another person, I think you have shared your Black Bart photo with me via email (back in October). I still have the wonderful jpeg. Is the first part of your email "rogerdog1"?

I will definitely put your great photo on my blog soon if I have your permission, and of course I will give you credit for it too.

Merlinsguy said...

Oops. But yes, you have my permission to publish it. Not that I own the copyright, but I don't the Black Bart would mind.

Merlinsguy said...

Uh, that would be "think."

Cox Pilot said...

There used to be a gate that crossed over the train tracks to the animal barns. It was closed off by the Small World ride. This looks like the same area.

Cox Pilot said...

After looking close at some old arial views, I realized that this gate was just behind the Tomorrowland Space Bar. The road would lead behind Rocket to the Moon, Red Wagon Inn, and exit onto Main Street at the usual spot for parades, at the Maxwell Coffee House.
Later, the gate and fencing were taller, and covered with metal sheeting.